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Rules of the Supreme Court of the United States

These are the Rules of the Supreme Court of the United States as revised on January 12, 2010. The amended Rules become effective February 16, 2010, as provided in Rule 48. For previous revisions of the Rules of the Supreme Court see 346 U.S. 949, 388 U.S. 931, 398 U.S. 1013, 445 U.S. 985, 493 U.S. 1099, 515 U.S. 1197, 519 U.S. 1161, 525 U.S. 1189, 537 U.S. 1247, 544 U.S. 1071, and 551 U.S. 1195.

Federal and State Rules of Procedure & Evidence

The rules set out in both state (usually Code of Civil Procedure) and federal (Federal Code of Procedure) laws that establish the format under which civil lawsuits are filed, pursued, and tried. Civil procedure refers only to form and procedure, and not to the substantive law that gives people the right to sue or defend a lawsuit.

The evidence that a trial judge may allow in at a trial for the judge or jury to consider in reaching a decision. Evidence is admitted or deemed inadmissible based on the applicable rules of evidence in the place where the case is being heard. The basic rules of evidence are the same in almost all jurisdictions. There are also both federal and military rules.

Source: Nolo's Plain-English Law Dictionary

Federal Rules of Civil Procedure

These rules govern the conduct of all civil actions brought in Federal district courts. While they do not apply to suits in state courts, the rules of many states have been closely modeled on these provisions.

Federal Rules of Appellate Procedure

These rules govern the conduct of all appellate actions brought in Federal district courts. While they do not apply to suits in state courts, the rules of many states have been closely modeled on these provisions.

Federal Rules of Criminal Procedure

These rules govern the conduct of all criminal proceedings brought in Federal courts.

Federal Rules of Bankruptcy Procedure

These rules govern bankruptcy proceedings in Federal courts.

Federal Rules of Evidence

These rules govern the introduction of evidence in proceedings, both civil and criminal, in Federal courts. While they do not apply to suits in state courts, the rules of many states have been closely modeled on these provisions.

11th Circuit Court of Appeals Local Rules

The United States Court  of Appeals  for the Eleventh Circuit has adopted these rules pursuant to Federal Rules of Appellate Procedure (FRAP) 47. They supplement the provisions of law and FRAP. To properly proceed in this court, counsel should read and follow FRAP, these rules, and the court’s Internal Operating Procedures (IOP) which describe the internal workings of the clerk’s office and the court.

United States Bankruptcy Court Local Rules - Georgia

Georgia Rules Evidence & Procedure

Georgia's state rules of procedure and evidence can be located in the Official Code of Georgia Annotated.  Look below to determine which title to browse or search to find these rules.

Local Rules

A set of procedural rules adopted by local, state, or federal courts that instruct parties and attorneys what the court's mandatory procedures are about things like the time allowed to file papers, format of documents, filing procedures and fees, basis for calculating alimony and child support.


Source: Nolo's Plain-English Law Dictionary

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