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Criminal Law

About This Guide

Criminal Law defines offenses against the community at large. It encompasses general principles of criminal responsibility, as well as the substantive law establishing specific criminal offenses. For the purposes of this guide, Criminal Law does not include Criminal Procedure or Evidence Law, which both have their own guides. As far as jurisdictions go, this guide covers Georgia Criminal Law and Federal Criminal Law, with a focus on the most essential sources and strategies. 

Getting Started

The following sources are good places to begin your research into Georgia's Criminal Law.  Secondary Sources like these describe and explain the law, which makes them an ideal entryway for researching an issue or topic. For a more complete selection of the library's secondary sources on criminal law in Georgia, check out the tab below. For a look at the library's entire collection of treatises, here's our Treatise Finder. If these treatises seem too detailed, consider a legal encyclopedia. For help with secondary sources more generally, check out our Secondary Sources Guide. If you want an overview for a law school class, study aids are your best choice. 

It's trickier to choose a single starting point for researching Federal Criminal Law. Because it is more specialized in nature, you can often find helpful treatises focusing on specific topics or statutes within Federal Criminal Law, such as Banking Crime and National Security Law: some of these are included below. 

Secondary Sources like these describe and explain the law, which makes them an ideal entryway for researching an issue or topic. For a more complete selection of the library's secondary sources on Federal Criminal Law, check out the tab below. For a look at the library's entire collection of treatises, here's our Treatise Finder. If these treatises seem too detailed, consider a legal encyclopedia. For help with secondary sources more generally, check out our Secondary Sources Guide. If you want an overview for a law school class, study aids are your best choice. 

Disclaimer: The views and opinions of the authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the State of Georgia, and shall not be used for advertising or product endorsement purposes. Georgia State University College of Law and the authors of the works contained on this website do not assume or accept any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, currentness, or comprehensiveness of the content on this website. The content on this website does not in any manner constitute the issuance of legal advice or counsel. The information on this website is intended to provide resources that may aid the research of the topics presented, and are in no way a comprehensive list of sources one should consult on the topics presented. Please note that case law, statutory law, and administrative law may be modified and/or overturned. Additionally, because the laws vary between jurisdictions, the laws referred to herein may or may not be applicable to the law within the reader’s jurisdiction.